The Flipped Classroom

The Flipped Classroom

The flipped classroom structure helps these students explore and understand the content at their own pace- self-directed. The instructor is responsible for structuring the flipped learning environment to give students confidence to develop questioning skills and therefore participating in a group environment, which should give the instructor a concept of how well the student is participating.  The group feedback and self assessment can be a form  of assessing the participation, and if the students is engaged.

Quick-start checklist to develop a flipped classroom.

Things you can do immediately

Design

  • provide ample time for assignments determine how much time would be required by a typical student and add a “buffer” to address various contingencies
  • differentiate between need to know (required) and nice to know (optional) information
  • allow students to work in pairs in labs where physical effort may disadvantage someone with a disability
  • collect mid-semester feedback to discover any problems or areas of confusion
  • provide ample time for online work in case of system malfunction

Delivery

  • always face the class and make eye contact when speaking
  • use a microphone when necessary
  • structure class time in a consistent manner
  • post course materials such as syllabi or handouts in Desire2Learn (D2L) or readings in the Library Online Reserve
  • allow students to submit assignments electronically
  • if you use electronic presentation tools (e.g., PowerPoint) make sure that presentation is legible (minimum 20 pt. font, with a high-contrast colour scheme)
  • provide feedback on work before the next assignment or assessment

Materials

  • consider providing lecture outlines (not complete notes) and advanced organizers for lectures that students can annotate during class
  • structure and format material for easy readability
  • provide students with materials in multiple formats: at the very least, provide digital equivalents of  hardcopy handouts
  • ensure that all digital materials you provide to students are in an accessible format (e.g., don’t provide PowerPoint files if not everyone has the software)
  • ensure all materials, case studies, etc., are free of negative stereotypes

Environments

  • ensure your course website is accessible and usable: use an accessibility checker to identify any potential problems
  • use “ALT” (alternate text) tags for any images on web pages so that they may be identified by text-browsers or by screen-reading programs used by students with disabilities
  • do a “room check” to make sure there are no problems with hearing, sightlines, or the arrangement of the furniture (e.g., enough left-handed seats). Ask students experiencing problems hearing, seeing, writing, etc., to come forward
  • when possible, request an appropriate room and/or arrange the room to facilitate the type of teaching you are doing
  • at the beginning of a course and/or in your syllabus, encourage anyone with a disability to come forward and speak with you about it
  • ensure people feel free to engage in discussion in your course without fear of ridicule or harassment; encourage the open

2. Things that you can do with some reflection and development

Design

  • consider the wide range of abilities, backgrounds, and experiences of your students when designing your activities and assignments
  • use online quizzes and self-tests to provide feedback for students
  • for writing assignments, allow for drafts and revisions; consider using peer review
  • design assignments that don’t unnecessarily penalize students for some experimentation and risk taking
  • review activities and assignments for the course and assess whether any would present an insurmountable barrier for persons with cognitive or physical disabilities; provide equivalent alternatives if possible
  • design assignments to minimize non-essential tasks (e.g., learning irrelevant software just to access information) or non-essential physical travel
  • provide choice in assignments if possible (including topic, format, and due dates)
  • consider using online conferencing for course support, discussion of content, and group work to foster peer-to-peer and collaborative learning
  • provide resources or materials equivalent to any materials that cannot be made accessible
  • provide grading schemes and sample assignments to students
  • apply grading standards consistently among students and across assignments
  • allow the use a word processor whenever possible for submissions

Delivery

  • consider using a variety of strategies during lecture periods including problem-solving, discussion, hands-on exercises, presentations, etc.
  • use techniques that increase interactivity in lectures such as think-pair-share
  • ensure examples and content used in class are relevant to people from diverse backgrounds and experiences
  • present information in multiple, complementary formats such as text, graphics, audio, and video
  • review your written materials including overhead and PowerPoint slides for clarity, consistent formatting, and cognitive cues; ensure they are free from unnecessary jargon
  • if unaccustomed to teaching large numbers of students in large auditoriums, seek advice or take a workshop on teaching larger classes
  • integrate your own research when it relates to the course of study; share successes and challenges

Materials

  • provide tutorials and resources that students reinforce learning outside of class
  • develop a list of Frequently Asked Questions and distribute to students
  • design documents that can be repurposed for multiple uses (e.g., in class, online)
  • use a variety of media such as text, graphics, audio, and video
  • where appropriate, offer a choice of file formats for content (e.g., Word, PDF, HTML) on your website and include labels which suggest when each might be useful
  • provide captioning or transcripts with any video used for class
  • develop a clear course outline that provides policies, procedures, and expectations
  • review CD or web-based tutorials for ease of navigation and user feedback; conduct usability testing with some students.

Environments

  • when possible, request an appropriate room and/or arrange the room to facilitate the type of teaching you are doing
  • in small classes, use circular seating arrangements during discussion to allow students to see one another’s faces

3. Things that you can do when you design or update your course

Design

  • ensure that learning objectives are SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and timely)
  • involve experts in course and curriculum design
  • consider a variety of teaching and learning techniques that include active and passive learning
  • ensure that course content, assessment, and learning objectives are consistent and all activities and assessment relate to a learning objective(s)
  • consider using a variety of assessment approaches and techniques (e.g., portfolio-based assessment)
  • design a web-based course site with online resources
  • ensure that the number of student hours of work is consistent with guidelines
  • review your course in detail when it has grown in numbers and/or moved from a small room to large lecture hall
  • consider gender, culture, disabilities, learning preferences, language, experiences, prior learning
  • consult someone with instructional design experience/expertise
  • consider ways to increase active learning strategies and student responsibility for learning

Delivery

  • consider if a “help room” may benefit your students in addition to regular office hours
  • divide each class into segments which use different teaching approaches

Materials

  • develop a process by which you can generate material and easily convert it to multiple forms
  • have captioned any video you use in your course

Environments

  • think about the kind of learning environment that would be optimal for your course
  • consider how blending online and face-to-face learning can allow you to enhance the range of learning materials and activities used in the course
  • design a course website that is accessible and minimizes the amount of clicking, hunting, or scrolling for information

http://www.uoguelph.ca/tss/uid/uidchecklist.cfm

reflect

As an educator I plan to use the flipped classroom techniques. I believe not all students can learn in the same environment, therefore the flipped classroom gives the opportunity to all learners to have their alone time to think and learn the content in their own environment. Also the most rewarding method to learn is to teach the content, one method for the flipped classroom techniques is to allow the learners in small groups teach what the learned.

More on Flipped Classrooms

http://www.edudemic.com/whats-a-flipped-classroom/

http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/mar13/vol70/num06/Evidence-on-Flipped-Classrooms-Is-Still-Coming-In.aspx

http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-with-technology-articles/understanding-the-flipped-classroom-part-1/

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